Embedded Motion Control/Tutorials/Creating a ROS msg and srv

From Control Systems Technology Group

Jump to: navigation, search

Description: This tutorial covers how to create and build msg and srv files as well as the rosmsg, rossrv and roscp commandline tools.

Contents

Introduction to msg and srv

  • msg: msg files are simple text files that describe the fields of a ROS message. They are used to generate source code for messages in different languages.
  • srv: an srv file describes a service. It is composed of two parts: a request and a response.

msg files are stored in the msg directory of a package, and srv files are stored in the srv directory.

msgs are just simple text files with a field type and field name per line. The field types you can use are:

  • int8, int16, int32, int64 (plus uint*)
  • float32, float64
  • string
  • time, duration
  • other msg files
  • variable-length array[] and fixed-length array[C]

There is also a special type in ROS: Header, the header contains a timestamp and coordinate frame information that are commonly used in ROS. You will commonly see the first line in a msg file have Header header.

Here is an example of a msg that uses a Header, a string primitive, and two other msgs :

Header header
string child_frame_id
geometry_msgs/PoseWithCovariance pose
geometry_msgs/TwistWithCovariance twist

srv files are just like msg files, except they contain two parts: a request and a response. The two parts are separated by a '---' line. Here is an example of a srv file:

int64 A
int64 B
---
int64 Sum

In the above example, A and B are the request, and Sum is the response.

Using msg

Creating a msg

Let's define a new msg in the package that was created in the previous tutorial.

roscd beginner_tutorials_<YOUR_NAME>
mkdir msg
echo "int64 num" > msg/Num.msg

The example above is the simplest where .msg file contains only 1 line. You can, of course, create more complex file by adding multiple elements per line like this:

string first_name
string last_name
uint8 age
uint32 score

There's one more step, though. We need to make sure that the msg files are turned into source code for C++, Python, and other languages. Open CMakeLists.txt in your favorite text editor (rosed from the previous tutorial is a good option) and remove # to uncomment the following line:

# rosbuild_genmsg()

Using rosmsg

That's all you need to do to create a msg. Let's make sure that ROS can see it using the rosmsg show command.

Usage:

rosmsg show [message type]

Example:

rosmsg show beginner_tutorials_<YOUR_NAME>/Num

You will see:

int64 num

In the previous example, the message type consists of two parts:

  • beginner_tutorials -- the package where the message is defined
  • Num -- The name of the msg Num.

If you can't remember which Package a msg is in, you can leave out the package name. Try:

rosmsg show Num

You will see:

[beginner_tutorials_<YOUR_NAME>/Num]:
int64 num

Using srv

Creating a srv

Let's use the package we just created to create a srv:

roscd beginner_tutorials_<YOUR_NAME>
mkdir srv

Instead of creating a new srv definition by hand, we will copy an existing one from another package.

For that, roscp is a useful commandline tool for copying files from one package to another.

Usage:

roscp [package_name] [file_to_copy_path] [copy_path]

Now we can copy a service from the rospy_tutorials package:

roscp rospy_tutorials AddTwoInts.srv srv/AddTwoInts.srv

There's one more step, though. We need to make sure that the srv files are turned into source code for C++, Python, and other languages.

Once again, open CMakeLists.txt and remove # to uncomment the following line:

# rosbuild_gensrv()

Using rossrv

That's all you need to do to create a srv. Let's make sure that ROS can see it using the rossrv show command.

Usage:

rossrv show <service type>

Example:

rossrv show beginner_tutorials_<YOUR_NAME>/AddTwoInts

You will see:

int64 a
int64 b
---
int64 sum

Similar to rosmsg, you can find service files like this without specifying package name:


rossrv show AddTwoInts

Gives:

[beginner_tutorials_<YOUR_NAME>/AddTwoInts]:
int64 a
int64 b
---
int64 sum

[rospy_tutorials/AddTwoInts]:
int64 a
int64 b
---
int64 sum

Common step for msg and srv

Now that we have made some new messages we need to make our package again:

rosmake beginner_tutorials_(YOUR_NAME>

Any .msg file in the msg directory will generate code for use in all supported languages.

The full specification for the message format is available at the Message Description Language page.

Getting Help

We've seen quite a few ROS tools already. It can be difficult to keep track of what arguments each command requires. Luckily, most ROS tools provide their own help.

Try:

rosmsg -h

You should see a list of different rosmsg subcommands.

Commands:
  rosmsg show Show message description
  rosmsg users  Find files that use message
  rosmsg md5  Display message md5sum
  rosmsg package  List messages in a package
  rosmsg packages List packages that contain messages

You can also get help for subcommands

rosmsg show -h

This shows the arguments that are needed for rosmsg show:

Usage: rosmsg show [options] <message type>

Options:
  -h, --help  show this help message and exit
  -r, --raw   show raw message text, including comments

Review

Lets just list some of the commands we've used so far:

  • rospack = ros+pack(age) : provides information related to ROS packages
  • rosstack = ros+stack : provides information related to ROS stacks
  • roscd = ros+cd : changes directory to a ROS package or stack
  • rosls = ros+ls : lists files in a ROS package
  • roscp = ros+cp : copies files from/to a ROS package
  • rosmsg = ros+msg : provides information related to ROS message definitions
  • rossrv = ros+srv : provides information related to ROS service definitions
  • rosmake = ros+make : makes (compiles) a ROS package

Next Tutorial

Now that you've made a new ROS msg and srv, let's look at writing a simple publisher and subscriber in C++.

Personal tools