0LAUK0 2018Q1 Group 2 - SotA Literature Study

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Contents

Introduction

This page contains the initial State-of-the-Art literature study performed by group 2 for the course Project Robots Everywhere (0LAUK0). The main research subject was broken down into several relevant topics. This literature study is divided into the following relevant topics:

  • Sensor Technology
  • User Interface
  • Repetitive Strain Injury
  • Dutch Arbo legislation
  • Existing products
  • Motor Control
  • Relevant developments at Eindhoven University of Technology

Each topic has a summary and a list of references.


Summaries

Sensor Technology

User Interface

Repetitive Strain Injury

Dutch Arbo legislation

We are interested in researching RSI with respect to working life in the Netherlands. As such it seemed useful to include Dutch legislation regarding working conditions in the state-of-the-art literature study, as our design/prototype would have to comply with this legislation. In order to keep employees safe, the Dutch government introduced the working-conditions-legislation; the Arbowet (Arbowetgeving, n.d.). The Arbowet consists of three levels of legislation. The Arbowet itself offers the basis of the legislation, and contains general conditions for all working places. The Arbobesluit implements the core of the Arbowet into rules that both employers and employees should obey. The last level consists of the Arboregeling, which builds on the Arbobesluit and offers concrete regulation. The Arboregeling includes demands for work equipment.

Employers should minimize health risks for their employees, this can be done by replacing work equipment by more work-friendly alternatives (e.g. replace loud machinery with a quieter model). The working space should adapt as much as possible to the individual properties of the employees. The employers should also minimize the amount of monotonous work. Employees should also provide adequate training to their employees to for instance make better use of the work equipment.


Existing products

The Dutch RSI Vereniging is an association that focusses on providing information about the effects of RSI and how it can be prevented. They also provide a rundown of possibilities regarding the setup of the working environment in order to prevent RSI (inrichting werkplek, n.d.). Backshop is a distributor of ergonomic office space working equipment. By investigating their catalogue it appears that ergonomic office design focusses on using the following equipment:

  • using ergonomically shaped mice and keyboards,
  • using fully adjustable office chairs,
  • using height adjustable desks, and
  • mounting monitors to movable monitor arms


The Altwork Station (Specs, n.d.) integrates a monitor, desk and chair into a single unit. Every component is hinged, meaning that the user can adjust all components of the desk when the integrated seat is reclined. The user can specify 5 desks positions that can be stored, which allows the desk to change layout (e.g. from standing desk to sitting desk) with the use of a single button. Obutto is another company that distributes all-in-one ergonomic desks. Their design focusses on having a reclined chair, which spreads the user’s weight over their lower back and thighs. Their design features multiple movable platforms, which can be used to place a keyboard or mouse. These platforms can also be swiveled such that they can be used to make notes or draw. An early ergonomic desk design can be found in a patent by Nagy & Foris (1992), which describes a height adjustable desk with a rotating keyboard assembly. According to Nagy et al., their design allows the user to use their keyboard in the most comfortable way. They note that the cervical spine should be relaxed, and the computer monitor should be at eye level (Nagy & Foris, 1992, col. 7).


Motor Control

Relevant developments at Eindhoven University of Technology

Reference Lists

Sensor Technology

User Interface

Repetitive Strain Injury

  1. Sorgatz, H. (2002). Repetitive Strain Injuries. Forearm Pain Caused by Tissue Responses to Repetitive Strain.
  2. Monsey, M., Ioffe, I., Beatini, A., Lukey, B., Santiago, A., James, A.B. (2003). Increasing Compliance with Stretch Breaks in Computer Users Through Reminder Software.
  3. Khilji, N., Smithson, S. (1994). Repetitive Strain Injury in the UK: Soft Tissues and Hard Issues.
  4. Maciel, R.H. (2000). RSI Prevention: A Brazilian Negotiated Program.
  5. Teng, Y.C., Ward, J., Horberry, T., Clarkson, P.J., Patil, V. (2015). Retained Surgical Instruments: Using Technology for Prevention and Detection.
  6. Visschers, V.H.M., Ruiter, R.A.C., Kools, M., Meertens, R.M. (2004). The Effects of Warnings and an Educational Brochure on Computer Working Posture: A Test of the C-HIP Model in the Context of RSI-relevant Behaviour.


Dutch Arbo legislation

  1. Arbowetgeving. (n.d.). Retrieved from [1]
  2. Arbeidsomstandighedenwet. (2018, January 1). Retrieved from [2]
  3. Arbeidsomstandighedenbesluit. (2018, July 18). Retrieved from [3]
  4. Arbeidsomstandighedenregeling. (2018, August 21). Retrieved from [4]


Existing products

  1. Inrichting werkplek. (n.d.). Retrieved from [5]
  2. Backshop producten. (n.d.). Retrieved from [6]
  3. Specs. (n.d.). Retrieved from [7]
  4. Obutto. (n.d.). Retrieved from [8]
  5. Nagy, M.K., Foris, V.G. (1992). U.S. Patent No. US5174223A. Washington, DC: U.S. Patent andTrademark Office. Retrieved from [9]


Motor Control

Relevant developments at Eindhoven University of Technology

Personal tools